Tools and Guidelines

Displaying results 1 - 10 of 306

Resource | Guidelines
Since 2007 the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) have recommended voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) as an important strategy for the prevention of heterosexually acquired HIV in men in settings where the prevalence of heterosexually transmitted HIV is high. Over 25 million men and adolescent boys in East and Southern Africa have been reached with VMMC services. These new guidelines update earlier WHO recommendations to maximize the HIV prevention impact of safe VMMC services and aim to guide the transition to the sustained provision of interventions with a focus on the health and well-being of both adolescent boys and men.  
 
 
Resource | Guidelines
All health workers who care for women and children during the postnatal period and beyond have a key role to play in establishing and sustaining breastfeeding. Many health workers cannot fulfil this role effectively because they have not been trained to do so. This updated training course is built upon the revised 2018 Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, the latest version of the guidance for implementing the Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) in facilities providing maternity and newborn services. The materials in this training course complement existing courses and can be used as part of the pre-service education of health workers.
 
 
Resource | Guidelines
WHO estimates that in 2015, 257 million people were living with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection worldwide, and that 900 000 had died from HBV infection, mostly as a result of cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Most HBV-associated deaths among adults are secondary to infections acquired at birth or in the first five years of life. In May 2016, the World Health Assembly endorsed the Global health sector strategy on viral hepatitis, which calls for the elimination of viral hepatitis as a public health threat by 2030 (defined as a 90% reduction in incidence of new infections and a 65% reduction in mortality). Elimination of HBV infection as a public health threat requires a reduction in the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) to below 0.1% in children 5 years of age. This can be achieved through universal immunization of newborns against hepatitis B and other interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HBV. These guidelines provide evidence-based guidance on the use of peripartum antiviral prophylaxis in HBsAg-positive pregnant women for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HBV.  
 
 
Resource | Guidelines
The operational handbook provides practical information and tools that complement the recommendations in the guidelines. The strategies described in the operational handbook are based on the latest WHO recommendations which were formulated by Guideline Development Groups using the GRADE approach. In many cases however, the recommendations in their current form lacked sufficient clinical and programmatic detail, which is important for implementation. This operational handbook complements the guidelines with practical advice based on best practices and knowledge from the fields such as pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, microbiology, pharmacovigilance and clinical and programmatic management.
 
 
Resource | Guidelines
The present WHO Consolidated Guidelines on Tuberculosis, Module 4: Treatment - Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Treatment includes a comprehensive set of WHO recommendations for the treatment and care of DR-TB. The document includes two new recommendations, one on the composition of shorter regimens and one on the use of the BPaL regimen (i.e. bedaquiline, pretomanid and linezolid). In addition, the consolidated guidelines include existing recommendations on treatment regimens for isoniazid-resistant TB and MDR/RR-TB, including longer regimens, culture monitoring of patients on treatment, the timing of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in MDR/RR-TB patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the use of surgery for patients receiving MDR-TB treatment, and optimal models of patient support and care. The guidelines are to be used primarily in national TB programmes, or their equivalents in Ministries of Health, and for other policy-makers and technical organizations working on TB and infectious diseases in public and private sectors and in the community.
 
 
Resource | Guidelines
This is a guide for governments, aid agencies, service providers, businesses and other groups on what to do to protect women from violence during the pandemic and its associated array of lockdowns, movement restrictions, services closures, and other disease control measures.
 
 
Resource | Guidelines
Despite long-standing WHO recommendations and significant investments in building testing capacity, in 2018 only 59% of HIV-exposed infants received a virological test for HIV by 2 months of age, and testing coverage is even lower at later time points for children who are still breastfeeding. Unfortunately, however, 50% of perinatally infected infants and 25% of infants and children infected during breastfeeding will die before 2 years of age without ART.
 
 
Resource | Guidelines
Despite increases in access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), declines in AIDS-related deaths have plateaued in recent years. Even after starting ART, patients with severe immunosuppression have a high risk of death. Implementing a package of care for patients with advanced HIV disease is critical; however, identifying those in need has remained a challenge.
 
 
Resource | Tools
Building on the seven Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs), this COVID-19 and Gender Rapid Self-Assessment Tool enables companies to assess their COVID-19 response and ensure they are supporting women during and beyond the crisis with gender-sensitive measures throughout their value chain. An Excel-based version of this self-assessment tool can also be used to develop a personalised action plan based on business actions to date, providing a clear path forward for companies to “build back better and more gender-equal.” 
 
 
Resource | Guidelines
In the health sector response to the HIV epidemic, collection, analysis and use of data are crucial at every level, from patient care and monitoring through programme management and national programme monitoring to global monitoring. This strategic information answers the questions: “How are patients doing?”, “How is the programme performing?” and “How can we do better?” Without these answers, the response to the HIV epidemic would be wandering in the dark. These guidelines – an update to the World Health Organization’s 2015 publication Consolidated strategic information guidelines – present a set of essential aggregate indicators and guidance on choosing, collecting and systematically analysing strategic information to manage and monitor the national health sector response to HIV.  Specifically, for programme management, these guidelines seek to strengthen programmes’ ability to identify and close gaps in service access, coverage and quality across the HIV services cascade, from primary prevention to knowing one’s HIV status to viral suppression. For programme monitoring, these guidelines seek to optimize and align national reporting used to assess countries’ progress toward the 2030 95–95–95 HIV Fast Track goals – 95% of HIV-positive people knowing their status; 95% of people who know their HIV-positive status on treatment; and 95% of those on treatment virally suppressed – and towards Sustainable Development Goal 3.3, which calls for ending the HIV epidemic, as indicated by reduced incidence.