Publications on People Who Inject Drugs (PWID)

Resource | Publications,
This case study will share the evolution of the participation of people who use drugs in the Global Fund and its national processes. It tells a story of the challenges drug user-led networks face nationally to participate meaningfully in Global Fund proposal development and decision-making. It highlights the progress that has been made with support from the Community, Rights and Gender (CRG) Strategic Initiative (SI). It also showcases the progress, impact and outcomes of people who use drugs participating in the Global Fund, showing the value and effectiveness of both national drug user-led organizations and the key role of the global network in facilitating successful engagement in Global Fund processes. Ultimately, it shows how with the right support, those often left behind can move from invisibility to influence.
 
 
Resource | Publications,
For centuries, criminal laws, justice systems, and prisons have been designed for, and by, men. The 2010 United Nations Rules for the Treatment of Women Prisoners and Non-custodial Measures for Women Offenders, also known as the ‘Bangkok Rules’, break away from this history by establishing the first set of international human rights standards that focus on the specific needs and experiences of women deprived of liberty. This briefing paper provides analyses the concrete ways in which punitive drug legislation has impacted upon the achievement of the Bangkok Rules, and offers several recommendations on how to translate the commitments set in the Bangkok Rules into drug policy.
 
 
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There are many people fighting the COVID-19 pandemic with all their might, but not all of them get much public attention. Among them are the frontline workers who continue to provide much-needed health services to people who use drugs. Every day, they stand up for a group of the most vulnerable people in society: people whose drug dependence often goes hand-inhand with social and health grievances, such as HIV infection, unemployment or homelessness. Most people who use drugs recognise the seriousness of the current situation. To minimise the risk of COVID-19 infection for themselves and/or others, they show great awareness of the risks and adhere to infection control measures in places where they use drugs or seek help.
 
 
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The mission of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) is to contribute to global peace and security, human rights and development by making the world safer from drugs, crime, corruption and terrorism by working for and with Member States to promote justice and the rule of law and build resilient societies.
 
 
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There is an increasing tendency to get service users, such as Drug Users (DU’s) involved in health services and health policies. Participation is seen as an indispensible ingredient for good and effective policymaking and there exist numerous best practice examples of peer involvement in the field of health promotion and prevention. Health policies and health interventions are considered to be more effective and supported, when all relevant parties and communities (including civil society and the final target group) are being involved equally. In addition, policy makers and professionals realise that it is no longer appropriate to talk about and not with the final target group. All kind of communities and also DU’s demand their rights: they want to be heard and they want to be taken serious.
 
 
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The Strategic Plan further cements IDPC's position as the global drug policy reform network, with over fifteen years of experience and constantly growing in reputation, size, scope, influence and reach. The IDPC Strategic Plan 2021-2023 will guide our network as it builds on the irreversible global momentum for drug policy reform, strengthens partnerships, and deepens bonds of solidarity with like-minded movements against oppression. The new Strategic Plan also updates the network's vision and mission, reflecting our movement's maturity, ambition and purpose.
 
 
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Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on harm reduction funding and service provision is essential for informing donor and government action as well as civil society advocacy. This report and briefing summarise evidence from civil society in seven Asian countries (Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Nepal, Thailand, the Philippines and Vietnam) and provides recommendations to donors and governments on protecting harm reduction in the COVID-19 era.
 
 
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"We live in a very difficult time in human history with many uncertainties and complex problems. The systemic human rights abuses faced by illicit drug users is one problem that can actually be fixed with the rescinding of the global UN conventions that legitimise and perpetuate the “war on people who use drugs.” INPUD is playing a crucial role in making the case for an end to the failed global policy of prohibition and there is much work to be proud of that you can see in this document. INPUD’s presence in global advocacy forums is especially important. INPUD provides a global voice for a community that has struggled in the face of adversity and oppression to gain access to basic respect let alone access to harm reduction services. The time has come for those who know that prohibition is tantamount to genocide to speak up and help INPUD, user organisations and drug users all around the world.
 
 
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The past year has been one of both consolidation and growth of the IDPC network. Despite a challenging geo-political climate and increased pressure on civil society space, there is no doubt that the drug policy reform movement continues to grow and attract new voices and allies. The IDPC Secretariat is proud and humbled to support and amplify the work of so many diverse and committed advocates from all over the world.
 
 
Resource | Publications,
This is the seventh edition of the Global State of Harm Reduction, compiled in a year when public health was leading the news agenda around the world. COVID-19 and the related measures introduced worldwide continue to disrupt life as we know it. This year the report added a new chapter dedicated to the impact of COVID-19 on harm reduction service delivery and people who use drugs. Also provided dedicated chapters on hepatitis C and tuberculosis (TB) to broaden the focus, in pursuit of a global health perspective.