Publications on Female Sex Workers (FSW)

Resource | Fact Sheets,
The 2021-2026 Global AIDS Strategy has bold and critical new targets on realizing human rights, reducing stigma, discrimination and violence and removing harmful punitive laws as a pathway to ending inequalities and ultimately ending AIDS. To aid in the scale up of interventions to remove these societal barriers, UNAIDS has produced a series of fact sheets on human rights in various areas, highlighting the critical need to scale up action on rights. They are a series of short, easy to digest and accessible documents outlining the latest epidemiology, the evidence of the impact of human rights interventions, the latest targets, and international guidelines, recommendations and human rights obligations relating to each topic. Fact sheets released in June 2021: HIV criminalization, HIV and people who use drugs, HIV and gay men and who have sex with other men, HIV and transgender and other gender-diverse people, HIV and sex work, HIV and people in prisons and other closed settings and HIV and stigma and discrimination.
 
 
Resource | Fact Sheets,
Female sex workers (FSW) is one of the at-risk populations of HIV infection. In order to keep track the HIV prevalence and the related risky behaviours among this population, the first Community Based Risk Behavioural and Seroprevalence Survey for Female Sex Worker in Hong Kong (CRiSP) was launched in 2006 and repeated in 2009. Both surveys showed low HIV prevalence with the results of 0.19% and 0.05% respectively.
 
 
Resource | Fact Sheets,
The 2018 Integrated Behavioral and Serologic Surveillance (IHBSS) Fact Sheets for Males who have Sex with Males & Transgender Women (MSM & TGW) and Female Sex Workers (FSW). With the alarming rise in the HIV cases in the Philippines, it is crucial that we get an in-depth understanding of the behavior and serologic aspects of our key populations who are at most risk for HIV infection.
 
 
Resource | Publications,

Sex workers and people who use drugs are subject to widespread violations of their human rights, which, for the most part, go unchallenged. Globally, these groups are subjected to repressive and discriminatory laws, policies and practices. These policies and practices fuel stigma, discrimination, widespread violence, and significantly increase the risks and vulnerabilities of both populations to sexually transmitted infections and blood borne viruses, notably HIV and hepatitis B and C.

 
 
Resource | Presentations,
Get an overview of the HIV/AIDS situation for Female Sex Workers (FSW) for 2017.
 
 
Resource | Publications,

Community-led organizations are led by the people who they serve and are primarily accountable to them. In the AIDS response, this includes organizations by and for people living with HIV or tuberculosis and organizations by and for people affected by HIV, including gay men and other men who have sex with men, people who use drugs, prisoners, sex workers, transgender people, women and young people.

 
 
Resource | Publications,

Communities make an invaluable contribution to the AIDS response. Communities of people living with HIV, of key populations—gay men and other men who have sex with men, people who use drugs, sex workers, prisoners, transgender people and prisoners—and of women and young people lead and support the delivery of HIV services, defend human rights, support their peers. Communities are the lifeblood of an effective AIDS response and an important pillar of support.

 
 
Resource | Publications,
The current study was designed to explore the individual profile of commercial sex workers and to examine whether the profile and sexual risk behavior differ by where the female sex workers came from and where they work.
 
 
Resource | Publications,
The objective is to determine the prevalence of HIV and associated risk factors among female sex workers (FSWs) in border provinces of Vietnam.
 
 
Resource | Publications,
Indonesia has a large population and is one of the top three countries, after Philippines and Myanmar, to have the highest rate of new HIV infections. Adolescent (15-19 years old) and young (20-24 years old) (AY) key populations (KP), including people who inject drugs (PWID), female sex workers (FSW), males who have sex with males (MSM) and transgender persons (TG), are extremely vulnerable to HIV transmission. However, very little is known about their socio-demographic characteristics, sexual risks, access to services, HIV transmission knowledge and perceived risk and HIV prevalence.