Publications on Young People

Resource | Fact Sheets,
Health services play an important role in reducing preventable poor health and supporting young people to make a healthy transition into adulthood. While many countries in Asia and the Pacific have made considerable progress towards effective coverage, and to some extent equitable coverage, of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, progress has not been realised for adolescents (age 10-19 years). Many national universal health coverage programmes exclude SRH services that are of particular priority and importance for adolescents. As a result, young people (age 15-24 years) continue to have a high unmet need for essential SRH services and coverage is particularly low among rural, less educated, poorer, and marginalised young people. This factsheet summarizes key recommendations to improve the inclusion of adolescents and young people in universal health coverage.
 
 
Resource | Fact Sheets,
We need to ensure a balance between protecting adolescents (age 10-19 years) from harm and respecting their agency and right to sexual and reproductive health (SRH). This factsheet addresses the issue of ‘rights versus protection’ through (1) Laws related to age of marriage; (2) age of consent to sex; and (3) age of consent to services.These laws which are intended to protect young people also need to incorporate adolescents’ agency and context of their lives. Adolescents’ agency needs to be at the centre of efforts to develop and implement legislation that impacts their lives.
 
 
Resource | Publications,
Achieving Universal Health Coverage (UHC) is a goal we should all be striving for. Across the world, countless people are suffering unnecessary harm and death as a result of lack of access to affordable, necessary healthcare. While all of us suffer to varying degrees when healthcare is not universally available, it is the most marginalized in our societies who are impacted the most. As a young transgender woman who uses drugs my communities are among those most impacted by lack of access to healthcare. Young Inadequately Served Populations (ISPs), particularly in the Global South, are the communities who are going to continue to be left behind if we do not achieve UHC.
 
 
Resource | Publications,
This review provides an update to the 2015 report highlighting the current status of young people’s sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and examines key SRHR priorities in Asia and the Pacific to support informed policy, programming and advocacy. This review has a particular focus on current evidence, policy and programme approaches related to key SRHR priorities in the region: child marriage and early union; adolescent pregnancy; young people with diverse sexual orientation and gender identity; SRH in a digital age; comprehensive sexuality education; and universal health coverage for adolescent SRH.
 
 
Resource | Publications,
Two out of every seven new HIV infections globally in 2019 were among young people (15–24 years). Additional efforts need to be made to address the structural factors that increase the vulnerability of adolescent girls, young women and young key populations and their risk of acquiring HIV, such as gender inequalities, gender-based violence, poverty, stigma and discrimination, and insufficient implementation of comprehensive sexuality education programmes.
 
 
Resource | Publications,
The HLM Youth Guide has been developed by The PACT and UNAIDS to provide young people with information and guidance on what is and how to engage in the High-Level Meeting on HIV & AIDS that will take place from 8-10 June at the United Nations General Assembly. The intended audience of this Guide are young activists and youth-led organizations working on HIV and SRHR at all levels of the response, especially those key populations most affected by HIV.
 
 
Resource | Publications,
This report presents a summary of the overall outcome of the First Round of Youth Voices Count (YVC)’s IGNITE! LGBTIQ Youth Empowerment Grants. In the course of nine months from April to December 2020 and in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, five youth-led and LGBTIQ-led organizations from five countries, namely Bangladesh, India, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Viet Nam have been approved with seed funding of up to USD 2,100 to carry out their proposed activities.
 
 
Resource | Publications,
The country case studies are a supplement to the report Young People and the Law: Laws and Policies Impacting Young People’s Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in the Asia-Pacific Region: 2020 Update, which provides a broad overview of whether countries in the Asia and Pacific region recognize the evolving capacities of adolescents in their laws and policies on the age of access to contraceptives, abortion services - where legal, HIV testing services, and age of consent to sex. The case studies illustrate how policy development concerning the sexual and reproductive health and rights of young people have proceeded in six diverse country contexts. They provide insight into the challenges of securing the sexual and reproductive health and rights of young people and the mechanisms of positive change.
 
 
Resource | Publications,
This report provides an update to the 2013 report highlighting recent legal and policy trends and developments affecting the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of young people in Asia and the Pacific. The review considers recent legal and policy developments that are supporting or impeding countries in meeting the goals and targets of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development relating to SRHR, which include achieving universal access to SRH services and ending the HIV epidemic by 2030. The report has a particular focus on whether countries recognize the evolving capacities of adolescents in their laws and policies on the age of access to contraceptives, access to safe abortion services, HIV testing services (HTS), age of consent to sex and the minimum age of marriage.
 
 
Resource | Publications,
This guidance is intended to assist anyone designing and/or implementing CSE in out-of-school settings, especially in low- and middle-income countries. This includes international and national civil-society organizations, community-based organizations, government departments, UN agencies, health authorities, non-formal education authorities and youth development authorities. It is also intended for anyone else involved in the design, delivery and evaluation of sexuality education programmes out of school, especially those working with the specific groups of young people addressed in the guidance.